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Visit our Closings and Delays page for more information.

Closings and Delays

Types of Stroke

image of three stroke brains

Unfortunately, strokes (sometimes called "brain attacks") can damage brain tissue in the outer part of the brain (the cortex) or deeper structures in the brain underneath the cortex. When this happens, partial or complete loss of function may occur. Prior to stroke, a person may experience a stroke event called a transient ischemic attack (TIA). A TIA should not be ignored because it could be an indicator of future stroke.

Approximately every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. A stroke can happen when the following occurs:

  • A blood vessel that supplies blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot. This is called an ischemic stroke.
  • A blood vessel breaks open, causing blood to leak into the brain. This is called a hemorrhagic stroke.

If blood flow is stopped for longer than a few seconds, the brain cannot get blood and oxygen. Brain cells can die, causing permanent damage.

 

 

 

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  • Balance

    Is the person losing his/her coordination or balance?

  • Eyes

    Is the person having trouble seeing out of one or both eyes?

  • Face

    Does the face look uneven or drift down?

  • Arm

    Does one arm drift down?

  • Speech

    Does the person's speech sound strange?

  • Time

    If you observe any of these signs, it is time
    to call 9-1-1. 

The faster a stroke patient receives treatment, the better the chances of recovery.

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