Cold and Flu Season Can Be a Monster

Flu & Cold Season Can Be A Monster

Help us protect our patients, families and staff from RSV and the flu by following these visitation restrictions effective November 1.

  • No visitors under the age of 12 are allowed in patient care areas.
  • Please do not visit patients if you are experiencing fever, vomiting, diarrhea or cold or flu-like symptoms.

Learn What to Expect From Pectus carinatum

  • Talk to your doctor about your child’s medications/vitamins/herbs. Some may need to be discontinued a week prior to surgery.
  • Discuss any possible bleeding disorders or other medical conditions that could impact surgery or anesthesia.
  • Do not give your child anything to eat or drink after midnight the night before the surgery.
  • Blood samples are taken in case your child needs a blood transfusion.

On the Day of the Surgery

  • Do not allow your child to eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the surgery.
  • Only give your child medications that the surgeon has recommended with a small sip of water.
  • You will receive a call from the hospital about arrival time.

After Surgery

Your child will remain in the hospital for four to seven days following the procedure.

  • Pain is common after this surgery. IV pain medications will be administered for the first few days.
  • Tubes will be inserted at the incision sites to help drain fluid from the chest. They will remain in place until the draining stops.
  • A day after surgery, your child will be encouraged to sit up in bed, take deep breaths and walk for short distances.
  • He or she will not be allowed to bend, twist or turn at first so that the bar has time to set in place.
  • Your child will be prescribed antibiotics to take while he or she recovers.
  • Your child will be able to shower five days after surgery.

Recovery: What to Expect in the Next Few Weeks

Most children will need pain medications for the first month. Usually it takes a month or two for your child to fully recover and resume normal activities. Your child’s pediatric surgeon can advise as to what sports are allowed.

Questions & Answers

Q:

What does the procedure involve?

A:

After your child receives general anesthesia, the surgeon makes two small lateral incisions on each side of the chest. Using a thoracoscope (small diameter telescope) to visualize the chest, a C-shaped bar is inserted subcutaneously through two small lateral incisions. The bar is located at the point of maximum protrusion, placed in front of the sternum and fixed in a compressing position to the ribs on either side. The bar is normally removed after two to three years during an outpatient procedure.

Q:

How many incisions are made?

A:

Two small lateral incisions are made on either side of the chest to insert the bar.

Q:

How long will my child stay in the hospital?

A:

Children will normally have to stay four to seven days in the hospital.

Q:

What is the recovery time?

A:

Most children will need pain medications for the first month. It typically takes a month or two for your child to fully recover and resume normal activities. Your child’s pediatric surgeon can advise on what sports are allowed.