Zika Virus

 

Centers for Disease Control

Zika Virus
 

The CDC maintains a comprehensive web site for patients and providers intererested in the Zika virus.

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How is Zika virus transmitted?

Zika is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. It can also be transmitted from a pregnant mother to her baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth. We do not know how often Zika is transmitted from mother to baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth.

What are the symptoms of Zika virus infection?

The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Symptoms typically begin 2 to 7 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito.
I am pregnant. How could Zika virus affect me or my unborn baby?
Infection in pregnancy has been linked with microcephaly (small size of baby’s head) and other poor pregnancy outcomes in babies of mothers who were infected with Zika virus while pregnant.  However, the rate of transmission and frequency of these complications is not certain.

Is it okay to travel outside of the United States?

Pregnant women in any trimester should consider postponing travel to the areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing. Pregnant women who do travel to one of these areas should talk to their doctor or other health care provider first and strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites during the trip.

Women trying to become pregnant should consult with their health care provider before traveling to these areas and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during the trip.

Affected countries of travel
(as of 1/26/16):

  • South America
  • Puerto Rico
  • Central America
  • Samoa
  • Caribbean
  • Cape Verde
  • Mexico

The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention recommends pregnant women NOT travel to the above listed areas at this time due to possible risks to the fetus related to Zika virus infection.

When used as directed on the product label, insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, and IR3535 are safe for pregnant women.

What should I do if I have already traveled to one of these areas?

Call your health care provider and tell them you have traveled to one of these areas.

Download A Printable Version of this Patient Information

North Carolina Department of Health & Human Services Zika Virus Provider Memo