Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) or mini-strokes, are brief episodes of stroke symptoms that typically last less than 24 hours.  Generally, no permanent loss of ability is noticed after a TIA. 

Our stroke caregivers also provide treatment and observation of patients suspected of having a TIA, including expedited diagnostic testing, risk factor identification and management, and patient and family education.

The symptoms of TIA include:

  • Sudden onset of numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden lack of coordination
  • Sudden onset of confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden onset of vision disturbance in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking or sudden dizziness
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

15% of all stroke patients will have experienced a TIA prior to the stroke.  The risk of stroke after TIA is:

  • 10% after 7 days
  • 14% after 30 days
  • 18% after 90 days

After a minor stroke, the risk of recurrence is even greater:

  • 11.5% after 7 days
  • 15% after 30 days
  • 18.5% after 90 days

 

 

 

  • Face

    Does the face look uneven or drift down?

  • Arm

    Does one arm drift down?

  • Speech

    Does the person's speech sound strange?

  • Time

    If you observe any of these signs, it is time
    to call 9-1-1. 

The faster a stroke patient receives treatment, the better the chances of recovery.

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