Join the discussion about health care issues in our nation and community on our blog, WakeMed Voices.

Manage Your Health

Share/Save/Bookmark
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Manage Your Health

Back to Health Library   Print This Page Print    Email to a Friend Email

Dubin-Johnson syndrome

Definition

Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a disorder passed down through families (inherited) in which a person has mild jaundice throughout life.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder. In order to inherit the condition, a child must get a copy of the defective gene from both parents.

The syndrome interferes with the body's ability to move a chemical called bilirubin from the liver. Bilirubin is produced when the liver breaks down worn-out red blood cells. It normally moves through the bile produced by the liver and into the bile ducts, past the gallbladder, and into the digestive system.

When bilirubin is not properly processed, it builds up in the bloodstream and causes the skin and the whites of the eyes to turn yellow (jaundiced). Severely high levels of bilirubin can damage the brain and other organs.

People with Dubin-Johnson syndrome have lifelong mild jaundice that may be made worse by:

  • Alcohol
  • Birth control pills
  • Environmental factors that affect the liver
  • Infection
  • Pregnancy

Symptoms

Mild jaundice, which may not appear until puberty or adulthood, is the only symptom of Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

Signs and tests

The following tests can help diagnose this syndrome:

Treatment

No specific treatment is required.

Expectations (prognosis)

The outlook is very positive. Dubin-Johnson syndrome generally does not shorten a person's lifespan.

Complications

Complications are unusual, but may include the following:

  • Reduced liver function
  • Severe jaundice

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if any of the following occurs:

  • Jaundice is severe
  • Jaundice gets worse over time
  • You also haveabdominal pain or other symptoms (which may be a sign that another disorder is causing the jaundice)

Prevention

Genetic counseling may be helpful for people who wish to have children and have a family history of Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

References

Berk PD, Korenblat KM. Approach to the patient with jaundice or abnormal liver test results. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2007:chap 150.


Review Date: 8/14/2010
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com
 
© WakeMed Health & Hospitals, Raleigh, NC  |  919.350.8000  |