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Hereditary amyloidosis

Definition

Hereditary amyloidosis is a condition in which abnormal protein deposits (called amyloid) form in almost every tissue in the body. These protein deposits damage the tissues and interfere with the function of the involved organs.

Alternative Names

Amyloidosis - hereditary

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Hereditary amyloidosis is passed down from parents to their children (inherited). For more information see: Primary amyloidosis.

Other types of amyloidosis, which are not inherited, may be:

  • Spontaneous, which means it occurs without a known cause
  • Secondary, which means it results from diseases such as cancer of the blood cells (myeloma)

For further information, see the specific type:

References

Gertz MA, Lacy MQ, Dispenzieri A, Hayman SR. Immunoglobin light-chain amyloidosis (primary amyloidosis). In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr., Shattil SS, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Churchill Livingston Elsevier; 2008: chap 89.


Review Date: 2/7/2010
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
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